Japanese park

Inside the spooky abandoned Japanese park where more than 800 lifelike statues stand amid overgrown shrubs


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Visitors would be forgiven for thinking they entered Medusa’s lair.

Hundreds of lifelike figures gaze straight ahead, some dressed in costumes and others imitating Buddhist deities.

But the striking stone carvings are actually the work of a Japanese craftsman acting on the orders of a wealthy local president called Mutsuo Furukawa.

Visitors would be forgiven for thinking they entered Medusa’s lair. Hundreds of lifelike figures gaze straight ahead, some dressed in costumes and others imitating Buddhist deities

But these speechless stone carvings are actually the work of a Japanese craftsman acting on the orders of a very wealthy man called Mutsuo Furukawa.

Some look out at passing visitors, others tilt their heads curiously, and a few look shyly down to the ground.

But these stone carvings are actually the work of a Japanese craftsman acting on the orders of a very wealthy man called Mutsuo Furukawa.

They stand near the city of Osawano in Japan in a village called Fureai Sekibutsu no Sato - which literally translates to

They stand near the city of Osawano in Japan in a village called Fureai Sekibutsu no Sato – which literally translates to “the village where you can meet Buddhist statues”.

They stand near the city of Osawano in Japan in a village called Fureai Sekibutsu no Sato – which literally translates to “the village where you can meet Buddhist statues”.

Furukawa paid a Chinese sculptor 6 billion yen (£ 44million) in 1989 for the figurines and hoped to keep them with him for eternity.

Today, more than 800 motionless gray statues gaze at the buses filled with tourists who come to visit the bizarre park.

Some of them are Buddhist deities and others are based on people Furukawa knew during his lifetime.

In some areas, the grass has grown so tall that only the tops of the characters’ heads can be seen.

Photographer Ken Ohki – who goes by Yukison – shared the astonishing images on his Blog.

“I found this amazing place in Toyama Prefecture. I felt like I had accidentally fallen into a no-go area. Incredible, ”he wrote.

Furukawa paid a Chinese sculptor 6 billion yen (£ 44million) in 1989 for the figurines and hoped to keep them with him for eternity.  He also had a stature of himself made

Furukawa paid a Chinese sculptor 6 billion yen (£ 44million) in 1989 for the figurines and hoped to keep them with him for eternity. He also had a stature of himself made

Furukawa wanted the park to be a

Furukawa wanted the park to be a “popular tourist spot” where “people could come and relax”

Photographer Ken Ohki - who goes by Yukison - shared the amazing images on his blog

Photographer Ken Ohki – who goes by Yukison – shared the amazing images on his blog

“I found this amazing place in Toyama Prefecture.  I felt like I had accidentally fallen into a no-go area.  Unbelievable

“I found this amazing place in Toyama Prefecture. I felt like I had accidentally fallen into a no-go area. Incredible, ”Yukison wrote

A male figure sits cross-legged on top of a podium with his hands clasped in front of him as a slight smile plays on his lips

A male figure sits cross-legged on top of a podium with his hands clasped in front of him as a slight smile plays on his lips

This woman, in her discreet button-down clothes, seems to be listening intently to something or someone in front of her

This woman, in her discreet button-down clothes, seems to be listening intently to something or someone in front of her

In some areas, the grass has grown so tall that only the top of the characters' heads can be seen when looking into the distance.

In some areas, the grass has grown so tall that only the top of the characters’ heads can be seen when looking into the distance.

He added that the village was built as a “popular tourist spot” where “people could come and relax”.

However, that didn’t stop him from feeling a little pissed off by the effigies and wondering if they came to life when no one took care of the night.

“You feel like something is moving every time you turn around,” he said.

Yukison wrote that he left shortly after taking his photos, “without looking back.”

Despite the park's goal of helping visitors relax, Yukison said on his blog that he felt somewhat pissed off by the effigies and wondered if they came to life when no one was taking care of the night.

Despite the park’s goal of helping visitors relax, Yukison said on his blog that he felt somewhat pissed off by the effigies and wondered if they came to life when no one was taking care of the night.

“You feel like something is moving every time you turn around,” he said. Yukison wrote that he left shortly after taking his photos, “without looking back.” “I felt like I had been in another world,” he added.

Commentators on the footage on RocketNews24 praised Yukison's work.  One of them wrote: “Wow!  This place is amazing.  It's really beautiful, when you try to understand the message behind '

Commentators on the footage on RocketNews24 praised Yukison’s work. One of them wrote: “Wow! This place is amazing. It’s really beautiful, when you try to understand the message behind ‘

Another said:

Another says, “I think it’s cool, not scary,” but a third disagreed, joking: “Just make sure you don’t blink when you go to visit”

“I felt like I had been in another world,” he added.

Commentators on the images on RocketNews24 praised Yukison’s work.

One of them wrote: “Wow! This place is amazing. It’s actually really beautiful, when you try to understand the message behind it.

Another said, “I think it’s cool, not scary,” but a third disagreed, joking, “Just make sure you don’t blink when you go to visit.”

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